St Albans District Fixers first event hailed as an unqualified success

All Saints’ church hall in Harpenden was a hive of activity last Saturday (12 February 2022) when the church hosted the first Repair Fair organised by the recently formed St Albans District Fixers. Some 40 attendees brought all manner of electrical and electronic goods including toasters, lamps, audio equipment, kitchen items and laptops  on which a skilled band of 8 amateur fixers worked their magic. A good number of items were fixed, to the delight of their owners, or declared fixable with a little more work.

The results were fed into the “Fixometer” maintained by The Restart Project. This indicates that 21kg of e-waste may have been averted as well as 225kg of CO2-equivalent emissions in the manufacture of replacement items. The equivalent of driving from Harpenden, through France to Madrid!

Bike repairs and servicing, and clothing and fabric repairs were also undertaken by other volunteers, skilled in their own fields. Meanwhile two members of the All Saints’ Catering Committee plied fixers and those awaiting a fix with teas, coffees and delicious home-made cakes.

Revd James Brown, Associate Vicar at All Saints’ commented “I was delighted that the church could host the Repair Fair. All Saints’ is committed to its EcoChurch programme and to care for God’s world, and so to bring people together for this was a real joy. Huge thanks to all the fixers, hosts, and those providing refreshments.” 

 

If the highly appreciative response of all attending on Saturday is any indicator, the success of future events organised by St Albans District Fixers is in no doubt. Plans are already underway for two events during SustFest22, one in St Albans and another in Harpenden. Meanwhile, if anyone reading this would like to share or develop their electrical and electronic fixing skills; the St Albans District Fixers would be delighted to hear from you.  To know more, look at the fixers pages on the Sustainable St Albans Website or get in touch at fixers@sustainablestalbans.org 

Pick one step. Learn about it. Do it (with our help).

Momentum towards the COP26 climate talks is building. It’s in the papers, on the news, on social media. Yet that focus shouldn’t only be on Glasgow; it needs action at all levels. We can also turn the spotlight on ourselves and ask “What action will I take during COP26? How will I raise my voice?”. Well, here’s an easy place to start. Simply pick one of the 16 climate actions below that interests you. Get inspired by our blog, get informed by our resources page, and then commit to take that step with Count Us In. Do one thing more, during COP26, and be part of a movement of change.


Over 16 weeks, we have run our #CountdowntoCOP campaign, encouraging people to sign up for one or more of the 16 Count Us In steps.  We have had a guest blog each week since July during the countdown to the UK-hosted COP, focusing on one of these 16 steps. The blogs are backed-up by detailed resources pages, to help you get started.

In this wrap-up, we lay out all the 16 blogs and resources pages in one place.

Our call to action is for you to pick one climate action below, let us help you get informed, and then take that step with Count Us In.


As a small, local environmental charity, Sustainable St Albans has always had some key principles at its heart. We are ordinary people like you. We care about the amazing district of St Albans. By finding positive ways to act, we want to empower local people to take a step to live more sustainably.

16 blogs by extraordinary ordinary local people

Over the last 16 weeks, some truly extraordinary ordinary St Albans District people have told us their own inspirational stories, shared with us their passions and taken time to tell other residents like you their secrets to success. Each has taken one of the 16 Count Us In steps and shared their knowledge so that the rest of us can positively act to live more sustainably in one area of our lives.

“St Albans District people have told us their own inspirational stories.”

Meet our Count Us in bloggers

The great thing about the 16 Count Us In steps is that there is something for everyone. You just start with one step.

Food and Fashion

If you love your food, take inspiration from Becky about Eating More Plants, from Juliet about Eating More Seasonally or from Caroline about Reducing Food Waste. How about fashion? There’s Emily’s look at Wearing Clothes to Last. Plus, Philip’s Repair and Re-Use blog is also great on thinking about what we already have before we buy new.

Fly less, Drive Electric, Walk & Cycle More

Susheel gives practical ideas for those wondering about how to cut down on short journey car use with her Walk and Cycle More blog. For medium and long journeys, try Shaun’s Drive Electric blog. Planning a holiday? – read James’ idea for a plane-free holiday in Fly Less.

Repaire Fair in St Albans

Home Energy

On the home front, energy use is top of the agenda. Don’t miss Judith’s blog about how she Insulated her Home – a Victorian end-of-terrace, no less. Ian has great advice about how to use less heating in Dial It Down. In a second blog, he gives easy steps to help you Switch Your Energy provider. Plus, Will tells his real life experience of having solar panels installed in Get Some Solar.

Money and Speaking Up

An area of our lives many of us have yet to tackle is Greening Our Money. Simon’s blog is eye-opening on that subject.

Finally, we must not forget the impact that we can all have by talking about climate action with other people. Each person we influence expands the ever-growing population of people who are making changes. Catherine’s blog about Talking to Friends introduces Climate Conversations as a framework. Dan encourages us to Speak up at Work. 18 year old Jess’s blog on Tell Your Politicians turns a daunting prospect into an achievable and necessary step.

“Each person we influence expands the ever-growing population of people who are making changes.”

And meet some people who have taken their first step

It’s great to be hearing from those have already been inspired by our #CountdowntoCOP campaign. Meet three people who have signed up to take a step on the special St Albans District Count Us In page.

Isobel is Eating More Plants

Fleetville resident, Isobel, says: “I pledged through ‘Count Us In‘ to reduce the number of meals I eat containing meat. I enjoyed being creative in the kitchen, using tofu and soya mince. I was pleased that I managed to convince the kids to try some new dishes, some of which they were impressed with. Meat-free meals will continue to be on the menu some nights, and when we do buy meat we will go for locally produced and high welfare standards.

Read Becky’s blog “Quick and Easy ways to Eat More Plants” so you can take the Eat More Plants step like Isobel.

 Banh Mi from Taste of Vietnam. Photo: Taste of Vietnam

Lizzie is Wearing Clothes to Last

Lizzie, also from St Albans says: “I pledged to buy only second hand clothes for two months. I often go to the charity shop but it’s a bit hit or miss. This time I decided to look on Facebook market place as I wanted a new warm jumper. I found one just round the corner from me and it’s become a new staple. I’ll definitely look there again in the future.

Read Emily’s blog “Easy Ways to Wear Clothes to Last” and pledge like Lizzie.

Linda is Driving Electric

Harpenden resident, Linda, says: “I pledged through Count Us In to try the step ‘Drive electric’.  We completed this step after a 2-month transition from running a diesel car each (blushes…), through sharing 1 car, to swapping that for an electric car.

The hardest part was overcoming range anxiety – after deciding which colour EV to buy, of course.  We tackled that by installing a charging point at home, powered by our own solar-generated electricity. We also found out where the neighbourhood ‘fast’ charging points are.

Looking back, the question to ourselves is – ‘Why didn’t we do this sooner?’

Read Shaun’s blog “The Road to My First EV: “Ill never own an electric car”” to help you take the Drive Electric pledge like Linda.

“Looking back, the question to ourselves is – “Why didn’t we do this sooner?”.

16 steps – just pick one

The 16 Count Us In steps are below. Pick one that interests you, read the blog, check out the resources and then click through to take that step on our own special St Albans District Count Us In page.

Remember when you register to tick to say you are part of the team “St Albans Climate Action Network”.

Which step will you pledge to take?

Talk to Friends

Read Catherine’s blog: 5 Good Reasons Not to Talk about Climate Change (and Why You Should Anyway)

Switch Your Energy

Cut Food Waste

Walk and Cycle More

Eat More Plants

Get Some Solar

Eat Seasonal

Drive Electric

Repair and Reuse

Dial It Down

Fly Less

Insulate Your Home

Wear Clothes to Last

Tell Your Politicians

Speak Up At Work

Green Your Money

We would like to express our heartfelt thanks to each of our bloggers for their fantastic and inspirational writing.

We’re in! – are you? Local residents Emily, Lizzie, Alastair, Kate, Caroline and Catherine are all taking action.

Join in with #CountdownToCOP today

It’s easy to join in with #CountdownToCOP. Environmental groups of St Albans District have come together to set up the St Albans Climate Action Network who are hosting their own special St Albans District Count Us In page. Simply visit the page, explore the 16 steps and pledge to take one step by choosing “Take a Step”. When you register, tick that you are part of the “St Albans Climate Network” to have your step counted on the St Albans page.

You can track the carbon impact of your own actions. As more people join, we will all see our cumulative efforts across St Albans, Harpenden and the villages. 

Easy ways to wear clothes to last

Greta Thunberg went on the cover of Vogue Scandinavia in August and called out fast fashion brands. According to the UN, the fashion industry is widely believed to be the second most polluting industry in the world, accounting for more than 20% of wastewater globally and between 8 – 10% of carbon emissions. There is huge scope to reduce our carbon emissions, simply by changing the way we shop.


This is Week 13 of our #CountdowntoCOP campaign, encouraging people to sign up for one or more of the 16 Count Us In steps.  We will have a guest blog each week until November’s UK-hosted COP, focusing on one of these 16 steps.

This blog, by Emily Southcombe of Upcycled Living, explains why wearing clothes that last is one of the most important – and simplest – things you can do to take part in Count Us In.


One of the #CountUsIn 16 highest impact steps to reduce your carbon footprint is “wear clothes to last”, whether this is buying clothes that you know are good quality and won’t fall apart after a few wears, buying second-hand, upcycling clothes or repairing what you already have. There is a lot of talk about the solutions to climate change being expensive but buying second-hand and wearing clothes to last will only have a positive impact on your pocket!

Second-hand is on trend

Since the very first “Second Hand September” campaign, run by Oxfam in 2019, a lot has changed. Lauren Bravo’s book ‘How to Break Up with Fast Fashion’ challenged us all to stop buying clothes which have a negative impact on the environment and the workers who made them. Second-hand clothes have gone from having stigma attached to them to becoming the eco-conscious and ethical thing to do. Campaigns such as ‘Slow Fashion Season’ by Slow Fashion UK have taken off and many people pledged to buy #nonew in 2021. The first Sustainable Fashion Week took place from 11th – 19th September where the organisers curated a week of community-led action encouraging people to change their clothes buying habits to protect both the planet and garment factory workers. 

“Second-hand clothes have gone from having a stigma attached to them to becoming the eco-conscious and ethical thing to do.”

Second-hand is more sustainable

If you love clothes shopping but want to reduce your impact on the planet one of the best ways to increase the lifespan of clothes is to buy second-hand. Sites like Vinted and Depop are great for online second-hand clothes although charity shops are still the best way to see what you are buying. Equally vintage markets such as Brick Lane market have a wealth of vintage treasures. Selfridges has second-hand concessions and also sells upcycled clothes including upcycled jackets from Levis.  More locally, St Albans area companies and influencers like Knickers Models Own, Luxe Leopard Lifestyle, The Preloved Edit and Twenty Outfits can help you hone your second-hand style.

Repair or upcycle your clothes

Many more people are looking at upcycling and repairing clothes themselves following the success of TV’s Great British Sewing Bee and The Repair Shop. Having holes in your clothes has often been seen as embarrassing (apart from ripped denim!) but there is no reason not to repair your clothes. It’s much preferable to throwing them away.  As the saying goes, ‘the most sustainable clothes are the ones already in your wardrobe’ and in the UK there is now a national movement of stitchers who are trying to encourage people to mend clothes to make them last longer. #stitchitdontditchit is run by a group of women who organise gatherings to promote the benefits of repairing clothes. Slow Fashion UK have also started hosting stitching parties. 

“As the saying goes, “the most sustainable clothes are the ones already in your wardrobe.”

How to get started with clothes repairs

All you usually need to do a simple repair is a needle and thread. Sometimes de-bobbling with a small hand-held gadget will give an item a new lease of life. If it is a more difficult repair job, and you don’t have a sewing machine, you can always go to a local tailor such as Stitch to Fit on Holywell Hill or A&A Tailoring on Catherine Street. At the Sustainable Markets during SustFest it was great to speak to people who were mending their own clothes and upcycling unwanted second-hand fabrics. The Repair What You Wear website is a fantastic resource which has loads of tips and advice for people who have never sewn before and are looking to do a bit of repairing. They also do mending and upcycling tutorials.

Making things last longer or repairing old things obviously isn’t limited to clothes, there is so much that can be repaired or upcycled in the home. 

Photo: Upcycled top by designer Philmore Clague
Photo: Upcycled top by designer Philmore Clague

Instagram inspiration

Have a browse of some of these Instagram feeds for inspiration.

Wearing clothes to last is an easy step

The great thing about the #CountUsIn campaign is that it encourages individuals to take steps that work for them. Not everyone can commit to making the same lifestyle changes and so it is great to sign up for the steps you are able to do and then get updates on the carbon you are saving both during the Countdown to COP and afterwards.

So for your step, why not jump off the fast fashion train and, instead, wear clothes to last. There is a saying that the world doesn’t need a small number of people doing sustainability perfectly, it needs millions of people doing it imperfectly. Next time you want to buy a new item of clothing, pause and think of the alternatives – upcycling what you own or looking at pre-loved options. Just have a go!

“..buying second-hand and wearing clothes to last will only have a positive impact on you pocket!”

We’re in! – are you? Local residents Emily, Lizzie, Alastair, Kate, Caroline and Catherine are all taking action.

Join in with #CountdownToCOP today

It’s easy to join in with #CountdownToCOP. Environmental groups of St Albans District have come together to set up the St Albans Climate Action Network who are hosting their own special St Albans District Count Us In page. Simply visit the page, explore the 16 steps and pledge to take one step by choosing “Take a Step”. When you register, tick that you are part of the “St Albans Climate Network” to have your step counted on the St Albans page.

Join in today and use Emily’s advice to help you choose the “Wear Clothes To Last” Step as your pledge.

You can track the carbon impact of your own actions. As more people join, we will all see our cumulative efforts across St Albans, Harpenden and the villages. 

We will have a blog every Sunday until the international climate talks in November, COP26. Each blog will focus on one of the 16 steps. Look out for next week’s blog “Tell your politicians” by Jess Simmons.

How to Repair and Reuse

Fixing is in my blood. It comes from an insatiable curiosity about how things work, be they black holes and the Big Bang, or why things stop working, like the kitchen drawer that suddenly won’t close. Quantum physics and General Relativity are beyond me, but I sorted out the kitchen drawer after close inspection. In between there is a huge range of things, both fascinating and (often) fixable.


This is Week 9 of our #CountdowntoCOP campaign, encouraging people to sign up for one or more of the 16 Count Us In steps.  We will have a guest blog each week until November’s UK-hosted COP, focusing on one of these 16 steps.

This week’s blog, on the step ‘Repair and Reuse’, is from expert fixer, Philip le Riche, who has run countless Restart Parties, keeping hundreds of fixed items out of landfill.


Why do I love to repair things?

It all started when, still at infant school, I was given a few batteries, bulbs, and bits of wire which I quickly learned to connect together. Not many years later I progressed to a crystal set which my father and I built. I messed with electronics throughout my teens, and unsurprisingly, took a degree in Electronic Engineering. For most of my life I’ve had some electronic project or other on the go. And if anything broke, my instinct was always to try and fix it.

“…for most of my life I’ve had some electronic project or other on the go. And if anything broke, my instinct was always to try and fix it”

Why do we have such a turnover of electrical and electronic goods?

Partly it’s because many devices are no longer built to last, but built to a price. On the other hand our toaster, a wedding present in 1979, is still giving daily service after 42 years.

Another reason is that spare parts and service manuals are often unavailable or exorbitantly priced, or essential security updates are no longer available. Some manufacturers, whilst trumpeting their green credentials in fact do all they can through legal, commercial and technical means to stifle the independent repair sector.

The Right to Repair movement was born in the US out of the frustration of farmers, often of necessity very practical folk, prevented from repairing their farm machinery. Right to repair legislation is often hotly contested by manufacturers, using specious arguments about safety and quality, indeed, recent legislation in the UK has been so watered down as to have little practical effect. The Restart Project has been at the forefront of campaigning.

St Lukes Repair Fair

The Restart Project and Restart Parties

When I retired I got more heavily into fixing. Looking around for a way to usefully employ my new found freedom, I came across the Restart Project. Their mission is to fix our relationship with electronics by enabling people to fix stuff instead of throwing it away. Watch the one minute Restart Code here. Not knowing very much what to expect, I attended my first “Restart Party” in Kentish Town Community Centre and found a real buzz: members of the public with their broken electrical and electronic items, and a dedicated group of skilled amateur fixers assisting them.

I immediately caught the bug and have since attended dozens of similar events. One of the fascinations is that you never know what challenges you’re going to be faced with. Perhaps the most unusual was a dentist who brought along his machine for filling root canals! (Unfortunately it needed a new transformer which we couldn’t help him with on the spot.) 

With more familiar items we often have a good success rate.

Table lamps and headphones we can almost always fix, or suggest where to get spare fittings. Radios, cameras, TVs and monitors, battery operated toys, musical keyboards, paper shredders and small kitchen, household or garden appliances are just a few of the many and varied items we’ve had success with. We see many laptops which, with suitable attention, could still give a number of years’ service.

As well as electricals, some repair events also cater for fabrics, bikes and furniture. The same curiosity about how things are put together will take you far with these too. Though not my speciality, I was thus able to replace the zip in my gardening anorak and repair a trouser pocket! If you want to learn how to mend clothes, Sustainable St Albans has an excellent page on Sustainable Fashion to help you get started, and YouTube is your friend!

The impact of repairs

Beyond the satisfaction of fixing something and seeing the delight on the owner’s face when you’ve done so, fixing helps reduce the mountains of e-waste produced every year, and the carbon footprint of replacing all those items.

During the 2021 lockdown, as one of a group of volunteers with local charity Computer Friendly, we refurbished many donated laptops for disadvantaged children. We estimated that manufacture of new replacement devices would have generated some 88,000kg of CO2, the equivalent of driving 460,000 miles or taking 90 return transatlantic flights!

St Lukes Repair Fair

How you can learn to make repairs

You might think that all this is beyond you, but why not have a go? There are lots of resources online to help you.

Screws are there to be undone, with just a little care and maybe an egg box to keep them organised. But you will do well to get a universal screwdriver with a good range of interchangeable bits. Just remember to unplug a mains device before starting, then be prepared to be amazed at what you find inside!

For the know-how, the Internet is your friend. Search for the make and model of your device with the problem appended, e.g. “disassembly” or “replace battery”. For hints and tips on a wide range of types of device, as well as basic theory, the Restart Wiki assumes no prior knowledge and provides a wealth of information.

Restart Parties and Repair Cafés are an excellent way of learning about repair and gaining confidence as well as getting your stuff fixed. Though suspended during the pandemic, they are held by various easily reached groups in London and one in Bedford, with more are springing up. Upcoming events are advertised by The Restart Project.  To start one locally we mainly need a small but keen group to organise it. Could that be you? Fixers can be found.

What individuals can do

  • Learn to make simple repairs.
  • Support the repair sector whenever you can. It provides good jobs as well as helping save the planet. Search online.
  • Offer your old smartphone, tablet or laptop on eBay, Freegle or Freecycle, even if broken, instead of leaving it in the bottom of a cupboard. But wipe your personal data first.
  • Consider buying independently but reliably refurbished devices rather than new, and save money! Do you really need the very latest model?
  • Recycle your devices, but only as a last resort. Recovering scarce raw materials can be difficult and expensive, but is better than landfill.

Remember every item you repair or reuse is progress towards a more sustainable future, and don’t forget to spread the word.

We’re in! – are you? Local residents Emily, Lizzie, Alastair, Kate, Caroline and Catherine are all taking action.

Join in with #CountdownToCOP today

It’s easy to join in with #CountdownToCOP. Environmental groups of St Albans District have come together to set up the St Albans Climate Action Network who are hosting their own special St Albans District Count Us In page. Simply visit the page, explore the 16 steps and pledge to take one step by choosing “Take a Step”. When you register, tick that you are part of the “St Albans Climate Network” to have your step counted on the St Albans page.

Join in today and use Philip’s inspiring advice to choose the “Repair and Reuse” Step as your pledge.

You can track the carbon impact of your own actions. As more people join, we will all see our cumulative efforts across St Albans, Harpenden and the villages. 

We will have a blog every Sunday until the international climate talks in November, COP26. Each blog will focus on one of the 16 steps. Look out for next week’s blog on “dialing it down” by Ian Yenney.

10 Easy Ways to Reduce Food Waste

I set myself a goal two years ago to reduce the food I waste. Since then, I’ve reduced my own food bill by £600 a year.


This is Week 3 of our #CountdowntoCOP campaign, encouraging people to sign up for one or more of the 16 Count Us In steps.  We will have a guest blog each week until November’s UK-hosted COP, focusing on one of these 16 steps.

This week, Caroline Wilson reveals how she has both saved money and reduced her carbon footprint by reducing her food waste. Caroline is a self-confessed foodie and food waste hero.  She runs the Living Off the Cupboard Facebook Group, inspired by her Mum’s ability to feed the family with what was already in the cupboard. Join her group here.


Food production accounts for 30% of greenhouse gases but as much as a third of food is wasted in the supply chain or by households.  In the UK, 70% of this waste is down to us, the consumer (Wrap, 2020) with the average household wasting £700 of food each year.

Reducing your food waste is such a great first step to pledge to do when trying to cut your carbon footprint. Food is something we prepare every day so if we think a bit more about the food we buy and use up each day, we can watch the money we save mount up as we help the planet. Here’s how:

Photo: Caroline Wilson. Vegan sausage rolls saved using the Too Good to Go Food App; salad, avocado and mango saved at the Sparks Community Café.

1. Watch what you waste

Figure out what you are wasting and why. Too tired to cook? Serving too much?  Bought something you already have? Since the introduction of kerbside collections, consumers have become more aware of their waste (Wrap, 2020). Make a note of what you put in your caddy and why. I realized that I served up more food than my daughter could eat. Solution, just serve smaller portions. 

2. Take Some Shelfies

Do you buy things you already have? Take a written audit, or some pictures on your mobile, particularly of the perishables.  Did you know that the most wasted foods are bread, potatoes and salad? – have a particular look out for those. Refer to the photos on your phone when you shop.

3. Run it Down 

Jot down ideas for meals you could make with what you already have in the house and only buy essentials until you have run your supplies down.  The first month I did this, I spent just £20 on groceries, followed by £90 the next month (it was £185 a month before).

4. Cobble It Together

Now for the fun! Start to cobble all those ingredients together.  Google new recipes or follow Danielle from the Cobbled Kitchen who teaches the lost art of cooking from scratch without a recipe.  Or join a group, where you can swap ideas. You’ll be amazed at what you can conjure up.

Vegetables from Oddbox, who save veg that supermarkets have rejected. You can try it with £10 off your first order via my referral link here. Photo: Caroline Wilson.

5. Soup it Up

Are you turning your veggie box into expensive compost?  Then make soup.  Even old veggies can be very forgiving in soup.   It’ll keep for days in the fridge or freeze it for when you need a quick lunch option.  For inspiration visit the BBC Good Food website.

6. Who Doesn’t Like Tupperware?

An excusable use of plastic, a good range of plastic storage containers helps save all those scraps – that quarter of a tin of tomatoes, half an onion, opened cheese, and leftovers. Great for storing in fridge or freezer and reusable for years.

7. Your Freezer is Your Best Friend

Keep as little in your fridge as possible.  Freeze what you can and defrost at the point you need it.  Bread is the number one wasted food (240 million slices a year) followed by milk, and yet both freeze really well.   You can freeze pretty much anything.  Check out the Good Housekeeping Guide.

8. Get Appy

Rescue food from the supply chain using the Too Good To Go App. Buy a Magic Bag of surprise food close to its sell-by-date from grocery stores, restaurants and cafes, at about a quarter to a third of its original cost, or sometimes even better. 

Also, check out the Olio app where you can both share with, and rescue food from, your neighbours.

Food from a Magic Bag from Simply Fresh Hatfield using the Too Good to Go App.  Some of the dishes have been a real treat! Photo: Caroline Wilson.

9. Get Social

Find local social enterprises joining the movement to reduce food waste including Community Fridges, Food Schemes, and Community Cafes.  For example, you can become Bread Buddy for the Sopwell Community Trust, redistributing bread in the community (I seriously don’t think I’ll ever have to buy bread again). 

The Sparks Community Café in Hatfield often rescues food close to its sell-by-date from supermarkets such as Waitrose, which can then be bought on a “pay what you can” basis, and sometimes is free.

10. Bin It (in the right bin!)

If you really have to bin it, follow your council’s advice for disposing of food waste: use your kerbside food waste caddy if you get one or your council compost bin if instructed to by your council. Don’t put the food into landfill. (When food rots in landfill, it releases harmful greenhouse gasses). Even better, start your own compost heap. There’s nothing quite like homemade compost 😊.  And if you can keep that kerbside caddy spotlessly clean – you know you are a real food waste hero!

We’re in! – are you? Local residents Emily, Lizzie, Alastair, Kate, Caroline and Catherine are all taking action.

Join in with #CountdownToCOP today

It’s easy to join in with #CountdownToCOP. Environmental groups of St Albans District have come together to set up the St Albans Climate Action Network who are hosting their own special St Albans District Count Us In page. Simply visit the page, explore the 16 steps and pledge to take one step by choosing “Take a Step”. When you register, tick that you are part of the “St Albans Climate Network” to have your step counted on the St Albans page.

Join in today and use Caroline’s inspiring advice to choose the “Cut Food Waste” Step as your pledge.

You can track the carbon impact of your own actions. As more people join, we will all see our cumulative efforts across St Albans, Harpenden and the villages. 

We will have a blog every Sunday until the international climate talks in November, COP26. Each blog will focus on one of the 16 steps. Look out for next week’s blog on walking and cycling more by Susheel Rao.